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Coronavirus

mrposhman

Tiger Legend
Oct 6, 2013
8,910
4,920
The worst people are pro tennis players. Completely selfish areseholes. It starts as a junior and continues from there. Their parents are usually arseholes too.

They are certainly doing nothing to change that perception.

I don't remember the Indian cricket team kicking up a stink like this.
 
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CarnTheTiges

This is a REAL tiger
Mar 8, 2004
20,137
2,998
Victoria
Just heard on the news what Agut said. How about you go back to Spain then without your min $100k.

Claims that the people keeping them in quarantine know nothing about tennis, practise courts and the like. How about you step back and realise that not everything is about tennis. This is about something a lot more impactful than tennis and you are being allowed to play tennis DESPITE that. Have some bloody gratitude to actually be able to continue on your day job you entitled prick.
On the other side of it, I heard Barbara Strycova on the radio this morning and she was great about it. Said yeah, I miss training, but you guys did this for 5 months, and the fact is I’m staying in a 5 star hotel for a couple of weeks.
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne
Feel a little bit sorry for the tennis players who were caught unawares. Super-fit athletes cooped up in smallish rooms are going to do it tough, but they were never going to get a sympathetic hearing from the public.
 

mrposhman

Tiger Legend
Oct 6, 2013
8,910
4,920
On the other side of it, I heard Barbara Strycova on the radio this morning and she was great about it. Said yeah, I miss training, but you guys did this for 5 months, and the fact is I’m staying in a 5 star hotel for a couple of weeks.

Azarenka too was pretty good about it. I do hope its the vocal minority that is kicking up a stink. Personally anyone who has whinged about it like this, I'd be happy for Tennis Australia to let them to their quarantine, then turn them around and say "your planes waiting for you, now *smile* off"
 

Legends of 2017

Finally!!!!!!!!!!!
Mar 24, 2005
4,366
1,343
Melbourne
Feel a little bit sorry for the tennis players who were caught unawares. Super-fit athletes cooped up in smallish rooms are going to do it tough, but they were never going to get a sympathetic hearing from the public.
I did at first as well. But then I read that there were video link ups to discuss everything that may eventuate and what would happen if people tested positive etc, and out of the 1200 or so players, coaches etc coming over, only around 80 bothered to participate in the video conferences..needless to say, my sympathies dissipated after hearing that
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne
I did at first as well. But then I read that there were video link ups to discuss everything that may eventuate and what would happen if people tested positive etc, and out of the 1200 or so players, coaches etc coming over, only around 80 bothered to participate in the video conferences..needless to say, my sympathies dissipated after hearing that
Ah yeah the information was available. They all seem to have "entourages" so someone should've been tasked with understanding it.
 

Tigers of Old

Proud of our Club.
Jul 26, 2004
67,504
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www.redbubble.com
On the other side of it, I heard Barbara Strycova on the radio this morning and she was great about it. Said yeah, I miss training, but you guys did this for 5 months, and the fact is I’m staying in a 5 star hotel for a couple of weeks.
Yes plenty of tennis players showing great understanding of the situation. That doesn't generate clicks or suit agendas however.
 
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eZyT

Tiger Legend
Jun 28, 2019
14,574
9,639
Yes plenty of tennis players showing great understanding of the situation. That doesn't generate clicks or suit agendas however.

yes.

Noam Chomsky should write a sequel to 'Manufacturing Consent' (1988)

'Manufacturing Hate'

thats largely what the media does these days, especially the (anti)- social media
 
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Tigers of Old

Proud of our Club.
Jul 26, 2004
67,504
8,823
www.redbubble.com
yes.

Noam Chomsky should write a sequel to 'Manufacturing Consent' (1988)

'Manufacturing Hate'

thats largely what the media does these days, especially the (anti)- social media
You see it all the time in the media these days unfortunately. Dial a quote to suit the angle you want to present, dressed up as 'news'.
 
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AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
21,223
6,781
yes.

Noam Chomsky should write a sequel to 'Manufacturing Consent' (1988)

'Manufacturing Hate'

thats largely what the media does these days, especially the (anti)- social media

You know Chomsky is about 94 years old now and still as sharp as a tack
 
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eZyT

Tiger Legend
Jun 28, 2019
14,574
9,639
You know Chomsky is about 94 years old now and still as sharp as a tack

doesn't surprise me one bit. A revolutionary mind like a steel trap.

he probably has written, or mentored

'Manufacturing Hate'
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne

‘We have beaten third wave,’ says PM (paywalled)​

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has emerged emerges from national cabinet saying ‘we have beaten the third wave’, but there’ll be no changes to international quarantine capacity.

Mr Morrison has confirmed no changes will be made to caps to incoming international arrivals.

National Cabinet will consider the caps again on February 15.

Mr Morrison said $20 million had been spent from a special fund to help Australians overseas facing financial hardship.

More than 40,000 Australians remain stranded overseas.

Mr Morrison welcomed Emirates announcing it will resume incoming flights to Australia.

Emirates will resume passenger flights to Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane from next week after they were temporarily suspended.

“We think it’s great,” he said.

“Remember, it’s not just those who are coming on these flights. These flights also carry important supplies. There’s freight involved in these air services and they’re going into our major capital cities. And that’s important for supply chains for a whole range of goods and services”
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne

Alan Tudge dashes university hopes for big foreign student intake (paywalled)​

Australia’s universities have been warned by new Education Minister Alan Tudge that it will be “very difficult” to get significant numbers of foreign students back on campus this year, amid fears the COVID-ravaged sector will lose up to $10bn from the closed international border.

In his first interview since Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s cabinet reshuffle in December, Mr Tudge also said he was determined to put Australian schools back on track after a horror year of lockdowns and online learning for students and parents.

Another priority would be finding new ways to commercialise university research.

Hopes of foreign students returning to university this semester have been dashed in recent weeks by national cabinet’s tightening of international arrival caps and Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews – whose state’s biggest export is education – saying it was “frankly not possible” to get thousands of students into Australia.

Mr Tudge, previously the acting immigration minister and population, cities and urban infrastructure minister, told The Australian there would be significant challenges to revive the foreign student sector by year’s end.

“It’s going to be very difficult,” he said on Thursday. “Our priority is ensuring that Australians can get home and Australians are kept safe from the virus.

“Obviously we’ll keep a close eye on this week-by-week and month-by-month and at all times guided by the health advice.”

The education sector expects an $8bn loss in tertiary fees in semester one alone if no foreign students are allowed into Australia. That figure rises to $10bn if there are no international students this year. The student cohort contributes $40bn to the broader economy.

More than 12,000 jobs have already been lost on campuses and higher education experts predict 2021 will be worse than last year if international student fees cannot prop up university research and teaching.

Former Australian Catholic University vice-chancellor Greg Craven predicted in The Australian this month that the nation’s universities would crash out of the top world 100 tertiary rankings due to the COVID-19 crisis.

Mr Tudge said he hoped Australian research universities would hold their top 100 research ranks but made clear he wanted the higher education sector to also focus on training and teaching the nation’s youth.

“I hope that universities can stay in the top 100 this year,” he said. “That will in large part be driven by the research output, particularly from the half a dozen universities already there.

“But that is just one dimension of universities as well. Universities are also there to educate Australian students and I want to ensure they continue to do a good job.”

Mr Tudge is also keen to ensure the government is leading on ensuring school-age students have a better year than 2020.

Millions of children were forced to learn online for at least half of last year and in Victoria, Mr Tudge’s home state, school students spent months longer at home due to the second COVID-19 lockdown.

Mr Tudge said he was confident schools would be open during all of 2021. The closure of schools is a state responsibility.

“It is so critical for kids to be back as much as humanly possible at school this year,” he said. “Going into the new school year, I am concerned about the impacts of kids not being in school for much of last year due to COVID.

“I know the state and territories share this (concern), and together we need to ensure no kid is falling behind or indeed has fallen out of school because of this.”

Mr Tudge said he wanted to lead a post-COVID revival of school standards, partly by improving teacher training in universities. “According to the international standards, a 15 year-old has fallen behind by as much as a year compared to a 15 year-old 20 years ago,” he said.

“We’ve got a role clearly in the funding which we’re stepping up to, in the curriculum. But importantly in teacher training courses in universities. Teacher quality is one of the most important drivers of increased standards.”

Mr Tudge faces a myriad of challenges in the universities space, from increasing foreign interference to freedom of speech.

He said universities had more work to do to prevent foreign interference after revelations China had recruited more than 300 scientists and scholars – and perhaps as many as 600 – at Australian tertiary and government research institutions through its talent recruitment programs.

“There is definitely a need to do more on foreign interference in the university space,” he said.

“We’ve outlined foreign interference guidelines for the university sector and they’re working through that, but this is going to be an ongoing issue.”

Mr Tudge said he would continue pushing institutions to uphold free speech on campus, after Mr Morrison was told by a mining executive on his regional Queensland tour this week that mining students were being “heckled” at university.

“We’re very serious about freedom of speech on campus,” he said. “Many universities are also taking this seriously, but there is still work to do on this.”

Mr Tudge said he wanted to have a new model for commercialising university research by the end of the year to help turbocharge the economic recovery. Australian universities have long failed to keep up with US and European research success.
 

DavidSSS

Tiger Champion
Dec 11, 2017
4,480
5,082
Melbourne
If Tudge wants Australian universities to stay high in the rankings then they need to fund them properly. The whole reason that the universities are so reliant on income from international students is the lack of funding.

Of course there remains the issue with the rankings, they are based on research output and have little or nothing to do with teaching quality, success of graduates or the like. But the universities are scared of the marketing loss if they fall down rankings.

Universities are offering to quarantine students in colleges but it is hard to see how they could do this in the numbers which would be required. Online learning is not the same and not really sustainable as a way to attract students to study at an Australian university.

It really is a mess and lots of local businesses are going under after losing income from students living here for a few years.

DS
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne
Too early to draw conclusions from Wuhan: WHO (paywalled)

The World Health Organisation has said it is too early to draw any conclusions from its mission to Wuhan as to whether the coronavirus pandemic originated in China.

A team of WHO experts arrived in Wuhan on January 14 to start investigations into the beginnings of the virus, more than a year after the first cases were detected in the city.

Having now completed a two-week quarantine, the investigation is now underway. Beijing has insinuated that the pandemic started outside of its borders, despite a widespread understanding that it started within the country.

“All hypotheses are on the table. And it is definitely too early to come to a conclusion of exactly where this virus started, either within or without China,” said WHO emergencies director Michael Ryan.

“There are different... scientific observations in different parts of the world... all of that is very important, because it builds up a picture,” he told a press conference in Geneva.

However, he added: “This is a big jigsaw puzzle and you cannot tell what the image says by looking at one piece in a 10,000-piece jigsaw puzzle.”

The virus has killed more than two million people so far, been contracted by tens of millions of others and taken a massive toll on the global economy.

“Let’s step back, let’s follow the evidence, let’s follow the science. Our team are on the ground, they are having a good experience working with our Chinese colleagues. We are working through the data,” said Mr Ryan.

- - - - -

But one of the WHO investigators has already made up his mind.

PETER DASZAK: The idea that this virus escaped from a lab is just pure baloney. It’s simply not true. I’ve been working with that lab for 15 years. And the samples collected were collected by me and others in collaboration with our Chinese colleagues. They’re some of the best scientists in the world. There was no viral isolate in the lab. There was no cultured virus that’s anything related to SARS coronavirus 2. So it’s just not possible.

https://www.democracynow.org/2020/4/16/peter_daszak_coronavirus

- - - - -

Note also that invitations to apply for the investigative team were only sent to members of a closed WHO group known as GOARN. Pretty obvious that the WHO investigation will effectively be a mission to restore China's reputation.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne

One in three COVID patients in UK readmitted within five months


Nearly a third of all patients discharged from hospital after surviving coronavirus were readmitted within five months and more than one in 10 died, according to fresh research in Britain exploring the deadly legacy of "long COVID".

The new insight was released amid signs Britain's latest national lockdown may have caused the second wave to peak.

Confirmed cases have been falling slowly for the past week and the number of people being hospitalised is flatlining in some areas. However deaths continue to rise sharply at a rate which could tip the United Kingdom's official toll above 100,000 by early next month.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock on Monday said more than 37,000 people were being treated in UK hospitals for COVID-19 - the highest number seen during the pandemic. One person is admitted every 30 seconds as a much more transmissible strain of the disease spreads across the UK.

But research by Leicester University and the Office for National Statistics released on Monday suggests the health system will remain under pressure for many months even after its current patients are discharged.

Of 47,780 COVID-19 patients discharged from British hospitals between January and September 2020, 29.4 per cent were re-admitted within five months and 12.3 per cent died.

They were readmitted at a rate 3.5 times higher than other hospital outpatients.

"With over three million people in the UK having tested positive for COVID-19 at the time of writing and many more who had the disease but never received a test, our findings suggest that the long-term burden of COVID-related morbidity on hospitals and broader healthcare systems is likely to be substantial," said lead author Kamlesh Khunti, a professor of primary care diabetes and vascular medicine at Leicester University.

The study, which is yet to be peer-reviewed, found COVID-19 patients discharged from hospitals were diagnosed with heart, liver and kidney complications at a far greater rate than others. Diabetes was also on the rise, he said.

Long COVID is a non-medical term used to describe the growing body of evidence that a severe infection can cause damage to the body long after a person recovers from their initial encounter with the disease.

Separate data from the Office for National Statistics found the coronavirus mortality rate in December was more than 2.5 times higher in the most deprived areas of England than in the least deprived.

The pandemic was the leading cause of death in December 2020 for the second consecutive month in England as well as Wales, where it accounted for 27.4 per cent of all deaths.

Hancock said the UK had vaccinated nearly 4.1 million people since December. Over half of those aged 80 and above have been given at least one of two doses.

"We are currently vaccinating more than double the rate per person per day than any other country in Europe," he said.
 
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123cups

Tiger Superstar
May 1, 2016
2,123
1,518
I haven’t been keeping up with the latest information, but wanted to check what you guys think about this basic expectation:

1. 80% of us will need to catch it eventually, it’s just a matter of whether we’ve taken a vaccine or not to mask our symptoms for when that happens.

2. The longer it takes for 80% of us to catch it, the higher the risk of new strains mutating and spreading.

Therefore, it’s safest for most of us to catch it ASAP, preferably while vaccinated to mask symptoms. Isolate the most at risk during each wave.

Is the above fair, flawed, or completely off the mark?