Global Warming | PUNT ROAD END | Richmond Tigers Forum
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Global Warming

mrposhman

Tiger Legend
Oct 6, 2013
9,572
5,727
For LTRTR. Clearly renewable energy is NOT driving your power bills up.


Within 2 days of that article comes the below one, closing the Yallourn power plant 4 years early in 2028 instead of 2032.


Coal appears to be on its deathbed in Australia. Still breathing, but struggling.


BTW - I'd love to know why my power bills haven't plunged like the wholesale price has.
 

RoarEmotion

Tiger Superstar
Aug 20, 2005
1,097
595
For LTRTR. Clearly renewable energy is NOT driving your power bills up.


Within 2 days of that article comes the below one, closing the Yallourn power plant 4 years early in 2028 instead of 2032.


Coal appears to be on its deathbed in Australia. Still breathing, but struggling.


BTW - I'd love to know why my power bills haven't plunged like the wholesale price has.
So as we lose base load generators and have supply that is only available when the sun shines and wind blows will this policy morass work? .


when I read it I basically read that they can force generators to turn off and some consumers to switch off but after that it’s rolling blackouts.

clearly you can’t have a grid that is 100% solar but you can have one that has some kind of mix

it Seems to me non rateable supply freeloads on ratable supply.
but also co2 emitting supply (typically rateable or even able to switch on demand like a diesel generator) is pumping its externalities into the global atmosphere

a Price mechanism as I read the policy above is going to only drive short term decision making and not force the investment in having power available when sun is off and it isn’t windy etc. need some smart solutions to this or renewables will eventually run us into blackouts if they become too much of the mix without makeup capacity being available.
 
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RoarEmotion

Tiger Superstar
Aug 20, 2005
1,097
595
Very interesting. There will definitely be an inflection point and an investment in storage needed as the mix chanGes. I just put panels on my roof as the payoff makes financial sense. But I get a guaranteed sell Price and despite being a relatively high income earner still got a ~30% subsidy off the total price. Should pay off for me personally in 3-4 years. But I’m contributing to putting the base load makers out of business and not having to pay for my (albeit small) contribution to instability and future network costs.
 

DavidSSS

Tiger Champion
Dec 11, 2017
4,904
5,663
Melbourne
We need more action on solar collecting power generation as they work overnight, would work well in Australia. Plus we can look to use reliable renewable energy such as tidal power.

DS
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
30,313
8,156
Melbourne
You can agree or not with the article but it has zero to do with Marxism.
"Our only chance is a thoroughgoing transformation. Specifically: “fundamental changes to global capitalism, education, and equality, which include inter alia the abolition of perpetual economic growth."

It's a far-left publication known for pumping up the likes of Bernie Sanders and slamming the major parties.

If you want a laugh, read the Australian's account of Tim Flannery's failed climate predictions, published yesterday. Doomsayers are pretty much always wrong.
 
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Sintiger

Tiger Legend
Aug 11, 2010
13,280
3,898
Camberwell
"Our only chance is a thoroughgoing transformation. Specifically: “fundamental changes to global capitalism, education, and equality, which include inter alia the abolition of perpetual economic growth."

It's a far-left publication known for pumping up the likes of Bernie Sanders and slamming the major parties.

If you want a laugh, read the Australian's account of Tim Flannery's failed climate predictions, published yesterday. Doomsayers are pretty much always wrong.
Missed the point.
Look through the rhetoric and concentrate on the science. Don’t concentrate on political philosophy because if climate change becomes about that then the discussion is doomed.
As I said, agree or disagree with the view on climate change but in my view political rhetoric and philosophy has nothing to do with it. It’s real or it’s not, doesn’t matter whether you are a Marxist or a fascist or anything else.
 

DavidSSS

Tiger Champion
Dec 11, 2017
4,904
5,663
Melbourne
If you want a laugh, read the Australian's account of Tim Flannery's failed climate predictions, published yesterday. Doomsayers are pretty much always wrong.

I'm not so desperate for a laugh that I would bother with the far right Australian.

What does it say, that after years of drought we have a massive rainfall event and the dams are full so climate change ain't happening. Usual bollocks.

DS
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
30,313
8,156
Melbourne

Scientists stunned to discover fossil plants beneath mile-deep Greenland ice


In the 1960s, U.S. Army scientists drilled down through nearly a mile of ice in northwestern Greenland — and pulled up a tube of dirt from the bottom.

Chester “Chet” Langway, who joined the UB geology faculty in the 1970s, was one of the leads of the drilling expedition, at a site known as Camp Century. The samples his team collected there, including the frozen sediment, followed him to Western New York. The materials resided here for a number of years before making their way to Copenhagen, Denmark. Then, the dirt was largely forgotten.

But in 2019, University of Vermont scientist Andrew Christ looked at the sediment through his microscope — and couldn’t believe what he was seeing: twigs and leaves instead of just sand and rock. That suggested that the area had been free of ice in the recent geologic past — and that a vegetated landscape stood where a mile-deep ice sheet as big as Alaska stands today.

Over the last year, Christ and an international team of scientists — including Elizabeth Thomas, assistant professor of geology in the UB College of Arts and Sciences — have studied these one-of-a-kind fossil plants and sediment from the bottom of Greenland. In addition to Christ, the research was led by Paul Bierman from the University of Vermont, Joerg Schaefer from Columbia University and Dorthe Dahl-Jensen from the University of Copenhagen.

“Our study examines in detail the sediments from beneath the Camp Century drill site on the northwestern part of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Our results suggest that at some point in the past 1 million years, the Camp Century site was ice-free,” says Thomas, who conducted chemical analysis that enabled the team to understand the types of plants that were on site.

“Ice sheets typically pulverize and destroy everything in their path,” says Christ, “but what we discovered was delicate plant structures — perfectly preserved. They’re fossils, but they look like they died yesterday. It’s a time capsule of what used to live on Greenland.”

The research was published March 15 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The discovery helps confirm a new and troubling understanding that the Greenland Ice Sheet has melted nearly completely during recent warm periods in Earth’s history. For example, in 2016, a study in Nature led by Schaefer and co-authored by UB geology professor Jason Briner estimated that a sample of bedrock from below the Greenland Ice Sheet was exposed to open sky for at least 280,000 of the last 1.4 million years.

Understanding the Greenland Ice Sheet in the past is critical for predicting how it will respond to climate warming in the future and how quickly it will melt.
 
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