Global Warming | PUNT ROAD END | Richmond Tigers Forum
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Global Warming

AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
23,267
8,901
It is the utmost arrogance to think that humans will be around in 5 billion years when the sun goes Red Giant.

Non avian dinosaurs were around for about 180 million years.

We've been around for about 1/5th of a million. And we've already nearly ruined the planet's ability to sustain us. Our time left is measured in thousands.

Yep, agree 100%. And as a species, despite all the beautiful things we have created, we don't deserve to continue. We've pharked up a perfectly good planet in less than 300 years of industrialisation. Not to mention the unspeakable things we do to each other and other species. In my most optimistic moments I imagine a human race that takes care of each other and the planet, but that's a long way off if ever.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,287
10,281
Melbourne
2affe5f82c8aa89f6926682eeb7dacb0.jpg
 
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Tigers of Old

Proud of our Club.
Jul 26, 2004
69,110
12,643
www.redbubble.com

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,287
10,281
Melbourne
Not to make light of the flooding in China but rather provide some perspective - China has been subject to the most devastating floods in history, where the death toll has at times been measured in millions.
 

MB78

I can have my cake and eat it too
Sep 8, 2009
7,115
802

24,000,000 pigs running wild, uprooting plants and soil causing enough pollution as 1,100,000 cars. We need an approach to reduce their numbers.
 

Harry

Tiger Legend
Mar 2, 2003
22,432
7,117
Yep, agree 100%. And as a species, despite all the beautiful things we have created, we don't deserve to continue. We've pharked up a perfectly good planet in less than 300 years of industrialisation. Not to mention the unspeakable things we do to each other and other species. In my most optimistic moments I imagine a human race that takes care of each other and the planet, but that's a long way off if ever.
correct. we are a cancer on the planet and the cancer's spreading rapidly. we've been here a millisecond and look at the vast changes and destruction we've made. fast forward 1,000 years. where will it end?
 
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Ridley

Tiger Legend
Jul 21, 2003
14,505
8,507
exactly Lee, this is my favourite part here. Pembroke corgis represent

View attachment 12859
Ha ha corgis are cool. We've got a Jack Russell rescue dog which we believe is crossed with a corgi. Jack Russell personality mixed with corgi chill. Very quirky.

How about the size of the ears on some corgis. We had some friends that years ago bought their corgi to our joint for a visit. That thing had ears so big I reckon you could stick a coat hanger up his bum and you'd pick up Foxtel.
 
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AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
23,267
8,901
Ha ha corgis are cool. We've got a Jack Russell rescue dog which we believe is crossed with a corgi. Jack Russell personality mixed with corgi chill. Very quirky.

How about the size of the ears on some corgis. We had some friends that years ago bought their corgi to our joint for a visit. That thing had ears so big I reckon you could stick a coat hanger up his bum and you'd pick up Foxtel.
Corgi/JR X, that's great!

94380078_545028116425481_1140704208140369920_ns.jpg

This is my guy, also a rescue... we believe corgi/lab cross. He's a weird unit too, good-natured though. About 3/4 size of a lab.
 
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Ridley

Tiger Legend
Jul 21, 2003
14,505
8,507
Corgi/JR X, that's great!

View attachment 12864

This is my guy, also a rescue... we believe corgi/lab cross. He's a weird unit too, good-natured though. About 3/4 size of a lab.
Cool dog Ant. Definitely looks like lab in there.

We also have a female JR rescue. Reckon she's pretty close to purebred Jack. And just like my wife she's the boss...........................
 
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AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
23,267
8,901
Cool dog Ant. Definitely looks like lab in there.

We also have a female JR rescue. Reckon she's pretty close to purebred Jack. And just like my wife she's the boss...........................

JRs have a lot of personality, a bit like JR8
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,287
10,281
Melbourne
The same researchers who've poo-pooed the state of the Great Barrier Reef have furiously backpedalled to avoid a China-led bid to have the Reef officially declared "in danger". What is the truth, bullshit artists?

Great Barrier Reef avoids ‘in danger’ status at UNESCO meeting (paywalled)

A push to have the Great Barrier Reef’s health status downgraded to “in danger” has failed, an outcome viewed as a diplomatic victory by the federal government and a missed opportunity by environmental groups.

In a virtual meeting on Friday evening, the 21 member countries of the China-led UNESCO World Heritage Committee agreed to repeal a draft listing that would have changed the reef’s status without an on-the-ground assessment. An amendment by Bahrain that blocked the draft status listing was supported by Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ethiopia, Hungary, Mali, Nigeria, Oman, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Saint Kitts and Nevis and Uganda.

The amendment extends until next year the timeline for an updated report on the reef. UNESCO delegates will travel to Australia to examine the reef. The issue will then be considered by the World Heritage Committee at its 46th session in 2023.

The Morrison government said it was blindsided last month by the UNESCO heritage committee’s move to change the reef’s classification.

The proposal was based on concerns about the water quality and the impact of climate change. Environmental groups in the US and Australia had pushed for the reef to be placed on the “in danger” list, arguing not enough has been done to combat climate change.

Environment Minister Sussan Ley said the committee’s decision would allow reef managers, marine scientists and land managers a chance to demonstrate the “success of the outstanding work” across the reef.

“This has never been about Australia hiding from the challenges facing the reef or the pressures of climate change, it has been about ensuring a fair and transparent process for the reef and the people who work tirelessly to protect it,” Ms Ley said on Friday night.

“Crucially, tonight’s decision will allow the World Heritage Committee to develop a framework that ensures all properties, including the 83 identified through the World Heritage process as being at risk from climate change, to be treated in the same way.”

Labor environment spokeswoman Terri Butler labelled the decision an “indictment” on the Morrison government. “The deferral is a temporary reprieve,” she said.

The Australian Marine Conservation Society agreed that the outcome ramped up pressure on the federal government to act on climate change and the reef’s water quality. “It puts the Morrison government, as custodians of our reef, on probation,” said the society’s world heritage consultant, Imogen Zethoven.

“The responsibility lies with them to reduce emissions in line with limiting global warming to 1.5C – a level recognised by scientists as a crucial threshold for coral reefs.”

Last month, UNESCO said it had recommended the reef be downgraded to an “in danger” listing because bleaching in 2016, 2017 and last year had compounded pollution and water-quality issues.

The UN body said the “in danger” listing would be a call to action and an opportunity to spearhead global action on lowering carbon emissions to protect the world’s biggest reef.

Last month, 11 countries – including Spain, Hungary and France – backed Australia in denouncing UNESCO’s lack of consultation in proposing the draft listing.

The Australian revealed this week that an assessment by the Australian Institute of Marine Science found the reef was showing signs of recovery, with some of the best coral coverage recorded in years.But the institute’s chief executive, Paul Hardisty, warned the reef continued to face a significant threat from climate change.
 

DavidSSS

Tiger Legend
Dec 11, 2017
6,008
7,378
Melbourne
Political pressure had way more to do with that than concerns for the reef.

China-led brief? I reckon they have far more important things they're worried about, nice line in conspiracy though.

DS
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,287
10,281
Melbourne
Political pressure had way more to do with that than concerns for the reef.

China-led brief? I reckon they have far more important things they're worried about, nice line in conspiracy though.
Hypocritical China uses the Great Barrier Reef as a pawn in its trade war against Australia by trying to have it declared 'in danger' and wipe out tourism - while it destroys huge reefs on its own coast to build military bases

China is complaining Australia's Great Barrier Reef is under threat from climate change while it tears up the South China Sea to build military bases.

Beijing is furiously building outposts in the powder-keg region, destroying huge bodies of lush reefs in its quest for military dominance.

The authoritarian regime's hypocrisy is not lost on on scientists who condemned its rampant destruction while using the Great Barrier Reef as a pawn in its economic coercion campaign against Australia.

Marine biology professor John McManus of the University of Miami said large patches of coral are 'gone forever' as a result of China's building.

'If you built something, if you've put dirt, rubble, and pavement… There's no way to recover that,' he told Radio Free Asia.

Beijing's construction of a number of concrete fishing and military outposts throughout the sea has received widespread international condemnation both because of its political and environmental consequences

Australia will contest a recommendation to list the Great Barrier Reef as a world heritage site 'in danger' after a United Nations body called for more government action on climate change

UNESCO have become heavily influenced by China and Australian officials allege the recommendation about the Great Barrier Reef is the Communist nation's latest way of applying political pressure

A draft recommendation from the UNESCO World Heritage Committee listed the reef's world heritage status as 'in danger' due to Australia's failure to address the effects of climate change on the 2,300km stretch of coral.

UNESCO is heavily influenced by Chinese officials, and its Australian members claim this is the latest move to apply political pressure to Australia.

The move is particularly hypocritical given their destruction to the South China Sea, home to 300,000sqm of coral reef.
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,287
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Melbourne
No scientific consensus yet on whether warming Arctic may lead to more extreme weather

In the past month alone, Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands have suffered horrific flooding, Siberia caught fire, and the Arctic Sea suffered near-record melting.

Meanwhile, in North America, after record-high temperatures, formerly rare fire thunderstorms have become near-daily events.

There is one big theory connecting climate change to the weather patterns behind events as disparate as fire and floods, heatwaves and melting ice, across three different continents.

It is elegant, reasonably easy to understand and has profound implications — but because it is at the frontier of climate science, not all researchers are yet convinced.

In one respect, the influence of climate change on heatwaves is relatively straightforward, according to Andrew King from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes at The University of Melbourne.

"We've warmed the planet by about 1.2 degrees Celsius and the land has warmed faster than the ocean," Dr King said.

"So, this allows heatwaves to be that bit hotter than they would be otherwise."

Dr King said a warmer atmosphere could also hold about 7 per cent more moisture for every degree Celsius of warming.

"That means storms that occur on very short timescales can rain out more than they would be able to in a world without global warming,: he said.

Instances of extreme weather can be driven by distinct weather patterns that allow rain or heat to build up over time because weather systems stall in one place instead of moving on.

If climate change is causing weather systems to stall for longer, they may build to more intense levels.

Late last month in Canada, a horseshoe-shaped high-pressure system called an Omega Block saw heat build up for days, leading to off-the-chart temperatures.

In Europe last week, a cut-off low pressure system stalled over Germany, dumping a month's worth of rain in a day.

The impact of climate change on how such individual weather patterns move is at the very limit of science.

"It's kind of like having a jigsaw but most of the pieces are missing," Dr King said.

"We have really incomplete observations in many parts of the world and they don't go back long enough in time to really track the climate for long enough."

That missing data — often from remote places like the Arctic — is needed to build computer models of unprecedented detail that can better predict weather patterns.

"We really need high-resolution simulations," Dr King said.

"We have a few studies with regional, high-resolution simulations that point to a climate change-caused intensification of short-duration extreme rainfall, including in Europe.

"That's quite a powerful line of evidence to suggest that climate change is [enhancing] — or has likely enhanced — the recent extreme rainfall we saw in Germany, the Netherlands and elsewhere.

"But we just don't have enough data to make really conclusive statements."

The missing data is crucial to answering one of the biggest questions in climate science: Are weather systems sticking around for longer in the Northern Hemisphere because of climate change?

The answer — which would connect heat, floods and fire — has everything to do with the jet stream.

Dr King says there is a belt of high-altitude winds that encircle the Northern Hemisphere, called the jet stream, and weather systems often follow that track.

Those winds are related to temperature differences between the cold polar regions and the warm tropics.

"In a warming world, we're seeing a bit more warming over higher latitudes in the polar regions than we see over the equator," Dr King said.

"And that reduces the temperature difference between the equator and the poles.

"The idea is that, if you reduce that temperature difference between the equator and the poles, both near the surface and higher up in the atmosphere, you might reduce the strength of the jet stream. And you might make it wavier or slower," he said.

A slower, wavier jet stream may allow storms to stick around longer, leading to more extreme weather.

But there is no conclusive evidence that the jet stream is slowing due to climate change.

"There are a variety of studies looking into this, some of which find evidence to suggest this is happening, particularly from the model-based studies, [and[ others, which suggest this isn't really happening," Dr King said.

One recent study used detailed computer modelling to show a warmer world would lead not only to more intense rain in Europe but also to slower storm movement.

However, its lead author — Abdullah Kahraman from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom — was at pains to qualify the limits of the study, saying it related to one very detailed computer simulation.

"This study does not really tell you that this will definitely be happening like that, because this is one scenario," Dr Kahraman said.

"Howver, when it comes to the jet stream issue, this is not the only simulation that is projecting some kind of decreasing wind speed in the higher atmosphere."

Other scientists have recently shown there may only be a modest decrease in high altitude winds due to a warming Arctic.

"It's basically an area of very active research, there are quite a few people around the world looking into this. And there is a diversity of views among scientists," Dr King said.

"At the very least, I think we can say that we don't have a great deal of confidence that this is a clear effect of climate change."

"But there is some indication that there might be more persistence of weather systems, as the jet stream may be allowing them to remain in place for longer.

"This could be contributing to some extreme weather events."
 

IanG

Tiger Legend
Sep 27, 2004
16,912
1,241
Melbourne
It was pure political lobbying that led to this result, nothing more. Certainly nothing to do with science. Plus if you look at the countries we lobbied to get to reject the decision, well none of those countries are exactly good world citizens which makes you wonder what exactly did we promise to them.
 
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