New Rules | PUNT ROAD END | Richmond Tigers Forum
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New Rules

CarnTheTiges

This is a REAL tiger
Mar 8, 2004
20,137
2,998
Victoria
I would say it's because they want to speed the ball up around the ground.

Give the team with the ball every opportunity to move it on.

As if the game isn't already a hot potato mess.

It won't be long before the ball will be knocked on from one end to the other for a goal.

The AFL always tell us that they listen to the supporters and followers and are only too happy to acknowledge it when they see fit but every year we say LEAVE THE *smile* GAME ALONE!!! but no... Another senseless rule gets added just to confuse us even more. Even the umpires get confused.

All I can say is, FMD!
This is because they don’t listen to the supporters, they listen to the loud voices in the media, and act on what they say, because they believe that the likes of Whateley speak for the people, they don’t.
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne
Some footage of the new rule in action on the HS website is causing a stir. The umpire must be obligated to call 'play on' the instant the player with the ball moves off the mark.

It looms as a clusterfuck but what else would you expect with Hocking in charge. Despite actively attempting to increase scoring, it has declined by 15% in three years - unprecedented in the history of the game.
 
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The Big Richo

Moderator
Aug 19, 2010
4,341
5,796
The home of Dusty
Some footage of the new rule in action on the HS website is causing a stir. The umpire must be obligated to call 'play on' the instant the player with the ball moves off the mark.

It looms as a clusterfuck but what else would you expect with Hocking in charge. Despite actively attempting to increase scoring, it has declined by 15% in three years - unprecedented in the history of the game.

Heard Grimes today on SEN and he said he felt sure the new rule will increase scoring and he was quite complimentary towards it. Tigers of Old's report on the intraclub match said it was hardly noticeable and possibly improved the game. I watched the Port intraclub and it had no impact that I could see.

In the Essendon one the player is a couple of metres to the side of the circle and shuffles across to the circle. If he did that going forwards over the mark it would be 50, the players now have to treat going sideways the same way. Don't move until you hear play on.

I'm sure there will be issues early on with 50s but it will be down to the players not remembering the rule and they will soon be drilled to do it. If it tips the balance back towards scoring then it's probably worth a go.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne
Don't move until you hear play on.
Much easier in theory than practice. Players are conditioned to stop the player with the ball. It's going to be a disaster, much worse than "protected area". Differences in implementation between umpires will decide matches.

I assumed that the introduction of such a rule would mean umpires were instructed to be red hot on calling play-on, but the focus in the highlighted example seems to be on possible transgression by the passive player.

They're making the umpires' job far too hard.
 
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DavidSSS

Tiger Champion
Dec 11, 2017
4,480
5,082
Melbourne
This is a disadvantage to being the first game each year, the umpires will be trying to work it out during the game. Given they have trouble with 100 year old rules anything could happen.

DS
 
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aoc1974

Tiger Superstar
Mar 1, 2015
2,283
3,462
This is a disadvantage to being the first game each year, the umpires will be trying to work it out during the game. Given they have trouble with 100 year old rules anything could happen.

DS
Christ, I hope we don't cop Razor Ray first up.... he'll have a field day.
I bet he's home right now practicing some ridiculous overly gesticulated manoeuvre to indicate that.... "yes people ..... look at me, look at me....... I'm making history here tonight !"
 

The Big Richo

Moderator
Aug 19, 2010
4,341
5,796
The home of Dusty
Much easier in theory than practice. Players are conditioned to stop the player with the ball. It's going to be a disaster, much worse than "protected area". Differences in implementation between umpires will decide matches.

I assumed that the introduction of such a rule would mean umpires were instructed to be red hot on calling play-on, but the focus in the highlighted example seems to be on possible transgression by the passive player.

I don't think it will be a huge issue. They've had a chance to drill it all summer and all they have to do is stand still. In a lot of ways it's very similar to standing the mark inside 50 in the past few years, now that everyone goes around the corner on set shots. The player on the mark knows the kicker is going to step off the line and snap the ball, but they also know they have to wait for the umpire to call it before they run forward.

In that video of the Essendon one, I don't even think anyone would have been looking for a play on call without the focus on this rule. The kicker barely even moves sideways, it's almost the natural movement of his kicking action. Regardless, when you stop the vision, the man on the mark has clearly gone two steps sideways before the kicker moves anywhere and the umpire is three feet from the man on the mark clearly yelling for him to stand still. He gives him three steps before he blows the 50. That's just a pure player error.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne
Regardless, when you stop the vision, the man on the mark has clearly gone two steps sideways before the kicker moves anywhere and the umpire is three feet from the man on the mark clearly yelling for him to stand still. He gives him three steps before he blows the 50. That's just a pure player error.
Yes it's classed as a player error when it's just an instinctive move to stop the player with the ball from gaining an advantage. Defensive speed off a standing start will be a new skill. When the player with the ball telegraphs his move, It will almost be like the start of an Olympic sprint with a similarly harsh penalty for "breaking". Players standing the mark sometimes have trouble hearing the "play on" call as it is.

So this umpire allows three steps, another umpire allows one step and the third umpire doesn't allow any (to the letter of the law). It really does have disaster written all over it.
 

Columbo

Tiger Rookie
Oct 4, 2007
487
85
Watch this rule get manipulated something chronic, I can see player with ball faking moves to draw a 50. Similar to a 4th down in NFL when the offence calls a hard count trying to draw the defence offside. Titch or Shai will be awesome at it.
 
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seven

Super Tiger
Apr 20, 2004
22,108
5,002
What happens if nobody stands the mark?
Have someone stand nearby to the player playing on.
 

year of the tiger

Tiger Legend
Mar 26, 2008
7,272
2,184
Tasmania
I like watching goals being scored but these are junk goals.

How does that Essendon example contribute to good watching and good footy. It doesn’t.

There is no skill involved - more goals scored like this is against the spirit of the game. The aim of winning is to play better, more skilfully, tougher footy than your opponent, not by getting more 50 m penalties than them.

the AFL have no idea again.
 
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The Big Richo

Moderator
Aug 19, 2010
4,341
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The home of Dusty
Yes it's classed as a player error when it's just an instinctive move to stop the player with the ball from gaining an advantage. Defensive speed off a standing start will be a new skill. When the player with the ball telegraphs his move, It will almost be like the start of an Olympic sprint with a similarly harsh penalty for "breaking". Players standing the mark sometimes have trouble hearing the "play on" call as it is.

That's why I think the players will adapt just fine, it's not really a new skill, but one they are used to executing already. That scenario you have described happens multiple times every game when players have a set shot on an angle. Everyone knows they are about to step around but the players hold the mark or the 5 metre clearance to the side and rush when they get the word. It happens again when there are stop plays deep defensively and players hold the mark and wait for the umpire to call move on, play on and then press forward.

Holding your place on the mark and waiting for the call to move isn't really foreign to anyone, it's really just a slight tweaking of that.
 
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Harry

Tiger Legend
Mar 2, 2003
21,264
4,614
Expecting at least 5 50m penalties against us in rd1, and 1 against Carlton.
 
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ToraToraTora

Two outta three ain't bad.
Mar 21, 2005
10,298
2,207
QLD
Ridiculous rule that wont do anything for scoring or anything else positive except drive punters insane. 50m is a huge penalty in our sport, and seeing it doled out for a guy having moved his toenail is simply mental.
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne
I like watching goals being scored but these are junk goals.

How does that Essendon example contribute to good watching and good footy. It doesn’t.

There is no skill involved - more goals scored like this is against the spirit of the game. The aim of winning is to play better, more skilfully, tougher footy than your opponent, not by getting more 50 m penalties than them.

the AFL have no idea again.
I guiess by removing a defensive skill (manning the mark) they figure the ball will move quicker and cleaner. It gives the kicker more options. Might see more teams adopt the Hawthorn tactic of shepherding on the mark.
 

ToraToraTora

Two outta three ain't bad.
Mar 21, 2005
10,298
2,207
QLD
Just had a squiz at Twitter. Not one positive comment. Hundreds against including Richo Rhett Bartlett and Woz Tredrea. Its just dumb.
 

ToraToraTora

Two outta three ain't bad.
Mar 21, 2005
10,298
2,207
QLD
Imagine this rule costing a GF. Tired players, mentally shot, toenail wiggles, gimme goal, all over. Not good.
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
29,852
7,634
Melbourne

Respected AFL umpire Shaun Ryan issues warning on new man on the mark rules (paywalled)​


Decorated umpire Shaun Ryan says the new man on the mark rule is set to make a tough job even more difficult for the whistleblowers this season.

Clubs are bracing for a wave of costly 50m penalties early in the season after the league’s call to ban the man on the mark from moving in any direction before play on is called.

The AFL has warned in briefings to clubs that even the slightest movement to the left or right from the man on the park will incur an immediate 50m penalty.

While the league is encouraged by the players’ adherence in match simulation in recent weeks following hundreds of meetings with clubs, Ryan said the new rule adds yet another layer of complexity for the umpires.

“It is certainly an area that is going to be difficult for the umpires because they’ve got so many things to observe and all of them are fatal,” Ryan said.

“If you miss the person move off the mark then you’ve missed the 50m; if you miss the guy play on and pay a 50m then it is big and if you miss the player entering the protected area then they are all reasonably big ticket items.

“And it is all within a second or two of the player taking the mark.

“So, it was tough prior to this because there is already a fair bit going on and often our priority is the man with the ball because as soon as he plays on all bets are off.

“That is really crucial and there is an emphasis on the protected area as well, but now there is going to be a bit of a priority with the man on the mark.”

There are on average 175 marks, 47 free kicks and 20 kick-outs a game (based on last year’s normalised playing time), when umpires will have to scrutinize any lateral movement from the man on the mark.

The AFL is confident the initiative will result in a more open, free-flowing and high scoring game.

“We want to see players do random acts, see more instinctive acts and take the game on,” said AFL operations manager Steve Hocking.

Carlton superstar Patrick Cripps said the shift would have a considerable impact on the game and favour teams with speed.

“If you are an attacking team I think it will benefit you a lot more,” Cripps said.

“It is really going to help guys who are really quick off the mark. Guys like Zac Fisher, (Adam) Saad and (Zac) Williams.

“I like the rule change because as a viewer you want to see the game open up and higher scoring.”

Ryan, who was regarded as one of the best umpires in the league and officiated in eight Grand Finals before retiring last season, said there would be an adjustment period for everyone.

He said it would be interesting to see if any leeway is given to the man on the mark throughout the season.

“Like any new rule there is going to be difficulties, there will be some teething issues, then over a period of time it tends to settle down,” he said.

“And then umpires will work out where their priority needs to be in terms of observation and what sort of lateral movement they are going to permit and players will understand where the boundaries are.

“After a little bit of time they will find some balance.”

Players will be subject to the new rules in their informal scratch matches next weekend and then for the full-blooded AAMI Community Series from March 4-8.

Ryan said the game had never been more demanding on umpires.

“It is definitely harder than when I started out just because is so much more congestion around the play and there is also a lot more rules that are trying to deal with things,” he said.

“When I commenced we didn’t have to worry about whether a player was dropping his knees or ducking. If he got him in the head it was a free kick.

“We didn’t have to worry about contact below the knees and all of these types of things.

“And sometimes you’ve got 0.01 of a second to decipher it all.

“So once player behaviour goes in a certain direction then the AFL attempt to address that and a lot of that is to do with the safety of the players and there is a good intention behind it.

“But obviously it means there are more things to take into account and the speed of the game (has increased).

“So it is certainly tougher now than what it was.”
 
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TT33

GO TIGES!!!
Feb 17, 2004
4,526
1,210
Melbourne
I like the fact that these new rules were extensively trialled before they were implemented.

Yep well done again SHocking you useless flog. Every rule change you've made to "increase scoring & make the game better" have had the opposite effect.
 
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