Our next great leap forward | PUNT ROAD END | Richmond Tigers Forum
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Our next great leap forward

Bennnny

Punt Road End. The best place to watch The Tiges.
Mar 29, 2005
1,253
408
Melbourne
www.indieinitiative.com
We arguably won the three premierships on the back of mindfulness, which gave confidence in the group to achieve their goals.
We had been way in front of the pack.
No doubt that advantage has been lost as others catch up.
re there any other areas where huge leaps can be made?
Fitness?
Diet?
Gameplan?
 
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tigerman

It's Tiger Time
Mar 17, 2003
16,751
8,123
We arguably won the three premierships on the back of mindfulness, which gave confidence in the group to achieve their goals.
We had been way in front of the pack.
No doubt that advantage has been lost as others catch up.
re there any other areas where huge leaps can be made?
Fitness?
Diet?
Gameplan?
Yes, mindfulness played a big part, as did Dimma and Trent's idea about vulnerability and Shane McCurry's Culture and Leadership training.

Hard to keep it house with Konrad Marshall's books, I loved those books, but part of me wishes we could've kept it all a secret as best we could.

If we can maintain our "connection", nailing the upcoming draft with all our selections will go along way towards us staying ahead, or at least up with the pack.
 
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TigerFurious

Smooth
Dec 17, 2002
2,586
1,176
Just keep running the club in a professional manner. Put good people in key positions and let them do their work but keep them accountable. Don’t let big egos take over. Never compromise the clubs values. Maintain fiscal responsibility. You know, all that boring stuff.

Seen too many examples of clubs that look for quick fix solutions only to condemn their entire club to decades of mediocrity. The nature of the game is very cyclical now. You can’t stay at the top indefinitely.

Like most things in life, get the fundamentals right and the rest will largely take care of itself.
 
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123cups

Tiger Champion
May 1, 2016
2,547
2,415
They know what they’re doing, I have total faith for what’s next, which I expect may include some of the below:

Systematically get more out of our talent than other clubs get from theirs. Look to the US for ideas. Continue tapping into what fulfils people holistically.

People are always tempted to focus on physical means of improvement, but don’t. It’s all about the mind and how minds work together. It’s a sport with 36 players on the ground at once in flexible roles, recruited from a small population. Pharmacological advantages won’t offer much. Culture, mindfulness and human connection still make sense to continue prioritising when talking about large teams of similarly talented people.

This is different to a field of finely-tuned Olympians separated by a hundredth of a second looking for an edge. They’re genetically absolute standouts. AFL players are closer to the wider population. And talent is spread fairly evenly across the AFL, so any strategy based around “having the best talent” will always be doomed to failure.

We should proudly view this as a low-talent sport because it means success comes from understanding people, which is something genuine that applies to life outside of sport. Success here means you’ve tapped into something that makes humans better people. The same is not true for an Olympic sprinter and the meaning behind winning a Gold Medal in an Olympic sprint. I think the AFL culture in general thinks the exact opposite, and they’re all wrong, and that our recent success was an example of this.

So keep doing what we’re doing. Especially mindfulness.

We’re only just scratching the surface of what’s possible when people support each other in pursuit of shared and meaningful life goals together as a team.
 
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Bennnny

Punt Road End. The best place to watch The Tiges.
Mar 29, 2005
1,253
408
Melbourne
www.indieinitiative.com
They know what they’re doing, I have total faith for what’s next, which I expect may include some of the below:

Systematically get more out of our talent than other clubs get from theirs. Look to the US for ideas. Continue tapping into what fulfils people holistically.

People are always tempted to focus on physical means of improvement, but don’t. It’s all about the mind and how minds work together. It’s a sport with 36 players on the ground at once in flexible roles, recruited from a small population. Pharmacological advantages won’t offer much. Culture, mindfulness and human connection still make sense to continue prioritising when talking about large teams of similarly talented people.

This is different to a field of finely-tuned Olympians separated by a hundredth of a second looking for an edge. They’re genetically absolute standouts. AFL players are closer to the wider population. And talent is spread fairly evenly across the AFL, so any strategy based around “having the best talent” will always be doomed to failure.

We should proudly view this as a low-talent sport because it means success comes from understanding people, which is something genuine that applies to life outside of sport. Success here means you’ve tapped into something that makes humans better people. The same is not true for an Olympic sprinter and the meaning behind winning a Gold Medal in an Olympic sprint. I think the AFL culture in general thinks the exact opposite, and they’re all wrong, and that our recent success was an example of this.

So keep doing what we’re doing. Especially mindfulness.

We’re only just scratching the surface of what’s possible when people support each other in pursuit of shared and meaningful life goals together as a team.
Great summation.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
33,135
11,449
Melbourne
Bionics. We fit this year’s draft crop with cutting-edge bionic implants which allows them to move at cartoon-like speeds and makes a hollow mockery of the game and Steve Hocking. After defeating Carlton by 296 points Hardwick warns, “You *smile* asked for it. We’ve got Terminators coming next year.”
 
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Carter

Tiger Legend
Nov 14, 2012
6,932
2,824
With 666 here to stay, I would be leaving no stone unturned in the quest to win centre clearances.

Four on four. How do we maximise energy and hunt at every single bounce? Three ruckman? Sixteen pure mids? Three Tom Mitchell types at every bounce?

How does the forward line line up to maximise quick scores from center clearance? What are the leading patterns, the ratio of talls, marking mediums, ground ball mediums, smalls?

Should we be playing genuine crumbing goal sneaks or continue to rely on pressure forwards?

With teams sagging back to defend and scoring getting harder and harder (thanks S Hocking) I think we should look at something completely new and revolutionary to win the 666 battle.

More goals you score, the more 666 scenarios are in play.
 
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Frank Booth

Tiger Cub
Apr 9, 2016
73
29
We arguably won the three premierships on the back of mindfulness, which gave confidence in the group to achieve their goals.
We had been way in front of the pack.
No doubt that advantage has been lost as others catch up.
re there any other areas where huge leaps can be made?
Fitness?
Diet?
Gameplan?
Sticking tackles
 

wammo

We're from Tigerland
May 16, 2007
523
135
With 666 here to stay, I would be leaving no stone unturned in the quest to win centre clearances.

Four on four. How do we maximise energy and hunt at every single bounce? Three ruckman? Sixteen pure mids? Three Tom Mitchell types at every bounce?

How does the forward line line up to maximise quick scores from center clearance? What are the leading patterns, the ratio of talls, marking mediums, ground ball mediums, smalls?

Should we be playing genuine crumbing goal sneaks or continue to rely on pressure forwards?

With teams sagging back to defend and scoring getting harder and harder (thanks S Hocking) I think we should look at something completely new and revolutionary to win the 666 battle.

More goals you score, the more 666 scenarios are in play.
I’d love to see some new thinking in centre square set ups. Last night (drunk) I was imagining a centre square set up with Soldo rucking, just sort of dropping it at his feet surrounded by Nank and Balta to monster the oppo mids and Prestia in there to do a bit of hoovering if required. I know there will be truck sized holes with this idea, but I’d really enjoy seeing it tried once or twice.
 
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angle ankle

Tiger Rookie
Aug 6, 2020
379
260
63
They know what they’re doing, I have total faith for what’s next, which I expect may include some of the below:

Systematically get more out of our talent than other clubs get from theirs. Look to the US for ideas. Continue tapping into what fulfils people holistically.

People are always tempted to focus on physical means of improvement, but don’t. It’s all about the mind and how minds work together. It’s a sport with 36 players on the ground at once in flexible roles, recruited from a small population. Pharmacological advantages won’t offer much. Culture, mindfulness and human connection still make sense to continue prioritising when talking about large teams of similarly talented people.

This is different to a field of finely-tuned Olympians separated by a hundredth of a second looking for an edge. They’re genetically absolute standouts. AFL players are closer to the wider population. And talent is spread fairly evenly across the AFL, so any strategy based around “having the best talent” will always be doomed to failure.

We should proudly view this as a low-talent sport because it means success comes from understanding people, which is something genuine that applies to life outside of sport. Success here means you’ve tapped into something that makes humans better people. The same is not true for an Olympic sprinter and the meaning behind winning a Gold Medal in an Olympic sprint. I think the AFL culture in general thinks the exact opposite, and they’re all wrong, and that our recent success was an example of this.

So keep doing what we’re doing. Especially mindfulness.

We’re only just scratching the surface of what’s possible when people support each other in pursuit of shared and meaningful life goals together as a team.

no offence but crap.
we're too small.
dees had 3 guys under 182cm in the prelim this year.
we had nine in the 2020 flag side. (plus stack & mansell now)
they would flex & break us.
imo.
 

Harry

Tiger Legend
Mar 2, 2003
22,923
8,128
We looked weak and lethargic most of the year and we were all expecting us to springboard up the ladder after thr bye but we completely flopped. Hope we're monitoring our fitness and conditioning and identified what went wrong compared to previous years. If you look at the grand finalists they're running on top of the ground which used to be us this time of year.
 
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123cups

Tiger Champion
May 1, 2016
2,547
2,415
no offence but crap.
we're too small.
dees had 3 guys under 182cm in the prelim this year.
we had nine in the 2020 flag side. (plus stack & mansell now)
they would flex & break us.
imo.

No offence taken.

I think Melbourne’s height is no different to other clubs, whereas their culture is different.

Culture is harder to measure than height, but it is visible.

Cotchin broke Mumford.