Global Warming | PUNT ROAD END | Richmond Tigers Forum
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Global Warming

TigerMasochist

Walks softly carries a big stick.
Jul 13, 2003
21,438
4,914
What I'm getting at is, if I get home after a day trip and need the car in the morning, how long am I going to have to stay awake while the bastard charges?
Pretty sure they'll charge up overnight.
But you'll need a big farkin battery pack attached to your sun shiny solar panels to charge your car up, or use smelly old coal fired lectricity if you don't have the solar battery pack. You could always leave your lectrict car at home during the day n charge the battery while the sun is shining of course n walk to work.
 

MD Jazz

Tiger Legend
Feb 3, 2017
8,340
5,668
Is it possible to "overcharge" and kill the battery if you forget to stop the charging process?

How much is a wall connector worth including installation?

Is it safe to charge in the rain?
I don’t think so. We use electric forklifts at work and smart chargers are just that, they prevent overcharging.
 

DavidSSS

Tiger Legend
Dec 11, 2017
6,851
8,891
Melbourne

Did you even read that article?

Here's a quote:

In the meantime, while the unexpected, decades-long overall increases in Antarctic sea ice extent are still being puzzled out, the sea ice extent has taken a dramatic turn from relatively gradual increases to rapid decreases. On a yearly average basis, the peak sea ice extent since 1978 came in 2014. Since then, the decreases have been so great that the yearly averages for 2017 and 2018 are the lowest in the entire 1979–2018 record, essentially wiping out the 35 y of overall ice extent increases in just a few years.

Which agrees with the graph I posted.

Not growing, was growing, but no more.

DS
 
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BT Tiger

Tiger Superstar
Jun 5, 2005
2,140
1,407
Warragul
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MD Jazz

Tiger Legend
Feb 3, 2017
8,340
5,668
Melb water storages at almost 90% with heavy rains predicted this weekend. We could be over 90% shortly. Remarkable.
 
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artball

labels are for canned food
Jul 30, 2013
4,766
2,563
How good's Straya?

What an absolute disgrace.

Its "technology investment roadmap" was deemed insufficient to decarbonise the economy, cut fossil fuel use and promote renewables.

"This failure to promote renewables ... is exacerbated by inadequate infrastructure investment despite subsidies for fossil fuel production and promotion of a 'gas-led' economic recovery following COVID-19," the ranking said.

"The country's international standing has been damaged by climate denialism by politicians, refusal to increase ambition and refusal to recommit to international green finance mechanisms."
 

TigerMasochist

Walks softly carries a big stick.
Jul 13, 2003
21,438
4,914
Melb water storages at almost 90% with heavy rains predicted this weekend. We could be over 90% shortly. Remarkable.
Lucky we didn't get any of that rain that Flannery predicted would never fill any of our dams. We musta got the proper old fashioned wet rain instead.
 

RoarEmotion

Tiger Superstar
Aug 20, 2005
1,827
1,516
I am liking Andrew Forrest's rhetoric recently on climate change. We need more people like him championing the economic benefits of clean energy, not just the environmental side of things.

Another view is he is trying to create a new monopoly by blocking competition from other hydrogen sources. That’s what I’d do as a capitalist.
 
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BT Tiger

Tiger Superstar
Jun 5, 2005
2,140
1,407
Warragul
Another view is he is trying to create a new monopoly by blocking competition from other hydrogen sources. That’s what I’d do as a capitalist.

Are you referring to blue and grey hydrogen alternatives? If he's guilt tripping others into green hydrogen then I'm all for it.
 

RoarEmotion

Tiger Superstar
Aug 20, 2005
1,827
1,516
Are you referring to blue and grey hydrogen alternatives? If he's guilt tripping others into green hydrogen then I'm all for it.

I’d imagine he would lobby government to ban them.

I’d prefer a price on carbon and let markets sort it out.

If green hydrogen wins in that scenario then great.
 

mrposhman

Tiger Legend
Oct 6, 2013
12,020
9,401
Another view is he is trying to create a new monopoly by blocking competition from other hydrogen sources. That’s what I’d do as a capitalist.

Thats a pretty cynical view. Do you have the same thoughts on Elon Musk with Tesla? If governments don't engage with businesses then there is little chance of getting anywhere near the climate goals that the world has.
 

BT Tiger

Tiger Superstar
Jun 5, 2005
2,140
1,407
Warragul
I’d imagine he would lobby government to ban them.

I’d prefer a price on carbon and let markets sort it out.

If green hydrogen wins in that scenario then great.

Pretty sure market forces have gotten us into the climate change mess in the first place, which is why i'm encouraged to see a big market player promoting economic benefits of green energy. Why does it matter if fossil fuel hydrogen sources are banned/lobbied against? Reckon that's a good thing.
 

RoarEmotion

Tiger Superstar
Aug 20, 2005
1,827
1,516
Pretty sure market forces have gotten us into the climate change mess in the first place, which is why i'm encouraged to see a big market player promoting economic benefits of green energy. Why does it matter if fossil fuel hydrogen sources are banned/lobbied against? Reckon that's a good thing.

We need to transition and transition hard but ideological opposition of fossil fuels whilst it may feel good has its own raft of massive negative consequences. Fossil fuel with ccs could be better than some of the other ‘green’ options and cause less net destruction.

Pricing externalities and then letting market forces take care of it will be he quickest way to make things happen IMO and will get to a much better answer than picking winners and losers. Europe has it right putting a co2 price at its borders.

Anywhere there is an issue, it is because externalities aren’t priced. Capitalism finds those gaps and exploits them hard. Whether it’s your life expectancy and cigarettes or unpaid child care of a partner at home that lets you work a 70 hour week the system sniffs it out.

The real solution will remain less demand (I.e. less people, more sharing of resources that sit in our homes and used once a month, goods that last for longer and don’t have planned obsolescence and are cheaply repairable etc etc - so we need to find a way to price those externalities too )
 
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AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
24,510
10,571
How much is that desal plant down at Wonthaggi still costing...? Talk about overreaction.
Went past Kardinia Dam on Cup Day and my mate pointed out inflow which he reckoned was from the desal plant. He knows about these things.

Amazing we are at 90% so quickly though.
 
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Giardiasis

Tiger Legend
Apr 20, 2009
6,850
1,267
Brisbane
Pricing externalities and then letting market forces take care of it will be he quickest way to make things happen IMO and will get to a much better answer than picking winners and losers. Europe has it right putting a co2 price at its borders.

Anywhere there is an issue, it is because externalities aren’t priced. Capitalism finds those gaps and exploits them hard. Whether it’s your life expectancy and cigarettes or unpaid child care of a partner at home that lets you work a 70 hour week the system sniffs it out.
Arbitrary CO2 prices do not price externalities. All they do is cause malinvestment because they have no reference to the action of parties involved. Only through preference demonstrated in action can we gauge what actors really value, and to try to deduce values from mathematical formulas (I’m assuming that’s how CO2 prices are determined) without the evidence of action, is a hopeless cause.
 
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