Sharks | PUNT ROAD END | Richmond Tigers Forum
  • If you are having trouble logging in to the forum please contact [email protected] // When reseting your password or awaiting confirmation please check that your email is correct and also your junk/spam emails.
  • IMPORTANT! Our inbox is full of email errors from members who have not updated their emails, please follow the instructions on how to update here
  • IMPORTANT // Please look after your loved ones, yourself and be kind to others. If you are feeling that the world is too hard to handle there is always help - I implore you not to hesitate in contacting one of these wonderful organisations Lifeline and Beyond Blue ... and I'm sure reaching out to our PRE community we will find a way to help. T.

Sharks

AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
23,877
9,662
So the "illegality" was irrelevant, now it's about lefty activists. These diversionary efforts are incredibly weak.


Here's the wackjob theory from Vic Hislop you quoted earlier in the thread. Yes, you literally claim that there is an attempt to cover up "the extent of the shark problem".

10 confirmed deaths last year. Globally. It's a tiny tiny problem unless you buy into the realm of wacky conspiracy. Do you?

^^ The above is the kind of case that Vic Hislop alleges is ascribed officially to other causes in order to conceal the extent of the shark problem.

GREAT WHITE SHARKS ROAM THE WORLD - HAVE HUMANS JOINED THEIR FOOD CHAIN?

BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – The worlds greatest shark hunter says swimmers are being devoured by Great White Sharks all over the world because humans are joining the ocean killer’s food chain.

More than one half a million people drown around the world each year. Many of their bodies are not recovered.

Vic Hislop, 60, who has hunted and slain thousands of sharks in his forty year career believes thousands of missing drowning victims actually die of shark attacks.

Many people who drown disappear off Australia's 9000 sandy beaches and he accuses its government of covering up the attacks to protect tourism.

Hislop became world famous in 1985 when he caught the biggest shark recorded, a twenty-one foot, eight inch long Great White weighing over five thousand pounds. The historic photograph of Hislop and his bloodied shark drove thousands of swimmers out of the water.

An expert on shark behavior, Hislop says, “At least a hundred swimmers disappear every year here and their bodies are never found. Many have been eaten. I’ve often caught sharks and removed human hands and feet from their stomachs. I even found a human foot still in its sandal.”

The government of Australia lists Great White Sharks as a protected species and its new laws have effectively put shark hunters like Vic Hislop out of business. Killers of sharks face up to two years in prison and the equivalent of a US $48 thousand dollar fine.

Australian records list 88 tourists from 12 countries drowned in Australia between 1992 and 1997. Thirty-eight of these tourists came from Europe, including 15 from the UK and 10 from Germany; 35 were from Asia including 17 from Japan while 7 were Americans.

Hislop maintains many of the missing did not drown but were devoured by Great Whites and other sharks.

“Every now and then a human washes up bitten in half,” he says. “But the Australian government refuses to tie them to the disappearances. When you add up the numbers it’s not hard to see what’s happening.”

Vic Hislop made a career of hunting down sharks that had become man-eaters, but now that Great White Sharks are protected, he says there is nothing to stop them from feeding on humans.

Hislop explains that from the time they are little sharks spend their entire life looking for other animals in trouble. “They’ll follow the blood scent and vibrations from an injured whale along currents until they find the source and rip the whale apart. That’s how sharks live.”

When people put down shark cages for their thrill-seeking clients some of the burley (blood and cut up fish bait and meat) travels up to 40 kilometers away, say Hislop. “These people would like you to think they are conservationists because they don’t kill sharks – but they are using thousands of edible fish as shark bait.”

He adds, “Sharks pick up the scent, become aroused and are ready to eat by the time they reach the cage containing a human. If the cages were not strongly made, or fell off to the bottom, those stupid people would be goners in seconds. Meanwhile the sharks are not killed after the event. They are simply being trained to hunt humans.”

People do not realize how often big sharks go past them while they are swimming. “There are monsters out there. I’ve caught Great White Sharks over 20 feet long and they have bite marks on them that make them look like babies – the shark that bit them was probably 35 foot long and weighing eight or nine tons.”

In warm areas like Florida thousands of sharks line up along beaches not far from swimmers. They are simply feeding on small fish and not interested in anything else. If somebody swam into those sharks they’d be safe, says the shark hunter. There are 350 species of sharks, but only four are dangerous: the Great White, Hammer Head, Tiger and Bull shark.

In 1937 the Australian government set out its first shark nets along the coasts after fatal shark attacks rose to record numbers in the 1920’s and 1930’s.

In the past 40 years there has only been one officially recorded fatal shark attack at the 134 beaches protected by shark nets. Yet there have been 15 deaths in South Australia, 12 in Western Australia, and 7 in Victoria — all states that lack shark nets along their beaches.

“But it’s just a false sense of security for tourism,” says Hislop. “The nets are way out and they don’t even go all the way to the bottom. And they’re staggered, you might have two kilometers of beach where people swim and the net will only be 150 meters long.”

Hislop claims that the nets are also full of holes. “Every two weeks government repair boats pull the nets in with holes in them that you could drive a train through. Those holes are made by Great Whites that have learned to feed off dolphins and sting-rays trapped in the nets.” Dangerous sharks may actually be attracted closer to swimmers by the very nets meant to keep sharks away.

Sharks are near most ocean access countries. Hislop says big sharks swim in cold waters off New York all the time and also on the northwest coast of America. They travel about 40 miles each day and are in most oceans of the world, preferring cold water.

He says the movie Jaws is supposed to have resulted in thousands of sharks being killed “but that is not true. The author of Jaws must have done a lot of research. Because that is how sharks work.

“The only thing that saves people from being attacked is what I call Shark hesitation. We are not natural to sharks – we are still foreign at this stage. But once they attack people in cages their hesitation is gone. They are using thousands of sharks now world-wide to do this.”

He explains, “They are putting chain-mail armored tourists down in big pools filled with sharks. That’s all right because those sharks are prisoners. But if they are ever set free they will become a menace.”

Sharks are perfect killers. They grab, rip and then swim in a big circle and wait for their prey to bleed out. They tear baby dolphins off their mothers and eat them while they are being born.

Even a dead shark can be dangerous. “If you put your hand in their mouth or touch their throat they can still snap. It’s a nerve reaction. Their brain is only as big as one half of one of their eyes. They don’t have a nervous system as we know it. Everything they do is by instinct.”

In recent years people have been attacked in front of dozens of witnesses. “It’s highly unusual,” said John West, curator of the Australian Shark Attack File. “I can’t recall anything like this ever happening before.”

Hislop blames killer sharks coming inshore on commercial fishing. “We’ve thinned out fish all over the world using nets. When fishermen take in 5000 tuna they are seriously depleting the ocean of shark food."

Hislop blames commercial film makers in Australia with teaching sharks to eat humans. He says commercial film-makers have tried for years to get footage of Great White Sharks by filling wet suits full of fish and nailing them to surf-boards so sharks would attack them on camera.. They also film Great Whites trying to get at people in shark cages”

“These people should be in jail, make no mistake,” says Hislop. “They are training sharks to eat people.”

There is a growing crusade around the world to protect sharks. One advocate is University of Miami Marine Biology Professor Dr. Samuel Gruber who says, “For every fatal human shark attack one million sharks world-wide die in the following hysteria.”

Hislop says, "In Florida, until they stopped it, they took people down to feed sharks just for thrills. Now those big sharks are waiting, expecting people to feed them.

"You feed them out on a reef and then one day you go out with your kids to do some spear fishing or take photos and those sharks show up expecting to get fed. Its shark and human interaction that we don’t need."

Hislop claims the sharks have been protected for all the wrong reasons. “Dolphins, sea turtles and millions of creatures out there that we love need our protection. But Great White Sharks need no protection. They are at the top of the food chain. They can live to be one hundred years old and eat a few dolphins and sea turtles every week. “If a conservationist killed just one Great White Shark and then retired, he would do more good for dolphins and sea turtles than he could have done in his entire career.”

The shark hunter says there is so much fear about sharks that the few people who survive attacks try to act brave when they are interviewed. “They will say they faced the shark and punched it in the eye making it retreat.

“Don’t ever believe you can defend yourself in a shark attack. When a shark grabs you its force and power is out of this world. Your body shuts down. It’s like a bull dozer running over you.

“You punch a shark in the head and your bones will be showing on your knuckles. That is how rough the shark’s skin is – it’s the roughest sand-paper anyone has ever seen.”

He admits, “It’s true big sharks have only one vulnerable spot – their eye. But they have a big thick nictitating membrane that covers it. Call it a third eyelid. That membrane is tougher than their skin and a person could not even stick a knife in it.”

The shark hunter says there is a pattern in Australia to cover up shark attacks.

“After a shark attack a squad goes to victims’ families before they talk to the news media. They say you need counseling because you’ve just seen your husband killed by a shark. They brain wash you in your weak moment. They say your husband died a hero and would not want his death to cause the wiping out of this endangered species.

“And those people go on TV and say that it wasn’t the sharks fault, my husband wouldn’t blame the shark,” says Hislop. “You ask the husband while the shark’s got a hold of him around the waist taking his life away and you’d see what he says about the shark!”

And what about the families whose loved ones are never seen again?

”It’s very hard. For them there is no closure. No body is ever found. They are doing it all wrong. Shark Hunters should be on the scene immediately,” says Hislop.

“I was called into Hong Kong,” he recalls. “Every year the same shark would kill a few people at one beach one day, then the next day he’d take a few at the next beach, then the next beach.

"The same shark killed 23 people in one year until it vanished into the waters off mainland China. We never caught him. He's still out there somewhere.

“Once a shark has tasted humans he will attack over and over again. A shark has a very small brain but he never forgets."

https://www.redandwhitekop.com/foru...m4n64cur4g&topic=271681.msg8282891#msg8282891
 

AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
23,877
9,662
I haven't followed this thread at all, but if there's any argument about the protection of sharks, then surely it is just an is what it is conclusion. Do we worry about lightening deaths and try and put a stop to lightening? Flooding, earthquakes, volcanoes? Nature will do what it does plain and simple. Let it be. Death is tragic but enevatable. We live in nature and we are mortal. thats just how it is.

On the scale of things more people are killed by pets in Australia each year. Or insect bites. But the media and those who are into this kind of stuff generate the mythology that sharks are incredibly dangerous predators that are regularly preying on humans. They aren't. We need to protect sharks and their habitats, instead of demonising them on incredibly flimsy evidence.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,823
11,110
Melbourne
So the "illegality" was irrelevant, now it's about lefty activists. These diversionary efforts are incredibly weak.


Here's the wackjob theory from Vic Hislop you quoted earlier in the thread. Yes, you literally claim that there is an attempt to cover up "the extent of the shark problem".

10 confirmed deaths last year. Globally. It's a tiny tiny problem unless you buy into the realm of wacky conspiracy. Do you?
I posted the theory after a family claimed that the recent victim in SA wasn't killed by a shark. That doesn't mean I subscribe to it. Vic Hislop's views are extreme, but some of them give pause for thought.

Beats me why you choose to be such a *smile* of a poster. You've only been off Ignore for a few hours. Back you go.
 
Last edited:

AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
23,877
9,662
Tell you what, I'll put this thread on ignore so I won't have to read your anti-shark stuff and you can post away to your heart's content.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,823
11,110
Melbourne
Surfer attacked by great white shark at world-famous wave

A surfer has been bumped off his sled and hit by a Great White shark at Jeffreys Bay, six years and four days after Mick Fanning was almost mauled by a White during the final of the J-Bay Pro in 2015.

The surfer, who is forty and from Cape Town, was helped from the water by other surfers around seven am.

He’s in a stable condition, wild puncture wounds to leg and body, as y’can see from the photo, and is currently in surgery.

Screen-Shot-2021-07-15-at-7.35.50-pm-806x1024.png
“What you may be looking at is a very lucky lad a few hours back at JBay’s ‘Point’ having survived a mauling,” Derek Hynd, surfing’s greatest influencer and J-Bay habitué, wrote on Facebook. “I don’t have his name at this stage or details of the encounter but the poor chap apparently suffered three nips. Another timely reminder to never take any surf, good bad or indifferent at many a Southern Hemisphere location for granted… deepest hopes for a full recover and many a memorable wave soon enough.”

Witnesses said the shark bumped the surfer then came back for the hit.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Wow
Reactions: 1 user

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,823
11,110
Melbourne
Jeese Lee, got any amputation shots you can post? Needed a graphic content warning.
(Or is that an enlargement of Dustys kidney?)
That one’s not too bad, just a few teeth indentations. Quite a positive encounter, really. You can imagine what a mouth that size would’ve done it if got proper purchase.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,823
11,110
Melbourne
Bit sensationalist, but relevant I guess.

Shark attack explosion as 800 people mauled in just nine years as swimmers ignore bloodbath warning signs

THE number of shark attacks has exploded across the globe as swimmers continue to ignore bloodbath warning signs - seeing nearly 800 people mauled in just nine years.

America has overtaken Australia for the number of attacks with Cape Cod, Massachusetts, now considered the shark capital of the world.

It seems graphic warning signs do little to influence beachgoers and swimmers
It seems graphic warning signs do little to influence beachgoers and swimmersCredit: Getty - Contributor

Experts report seeing 50 in the popular holiday haven alone this summer.

However, despite a spike in maulings by the ferocious beasts and signs warning of attacks on beaches in the US and Australia, swimmers are still putting themselves at risk.

This year has seen 49 shark attacks - six being fatal - across the globe, as the underwater predators continue to get closer to humans.

The US recorded the largest number of shark bites, reporting 33 incidents, while Australia recorded 18.

A whopping 791 shark attacks have been reported between 2010 and 2019, according to data published by the International Shark Attack File, with an annual global average of 80 bites.

It shows an incredible rise compared to data from 1970 to 1979, when just 157 attacks were reported.

Surfers and water sports lovers seem to be the prime targets, accounting for 61 per cent of victims last year.

Great whites have taken a chunk out of five swimmers since 2012 in Cape Cod, including one fatality.

The area is just a few miles north of Martha's Vineyard - where Amity Bay, the fictional island in the Jaws films, was located.



It seems life is imitating art, as the species, which can grow up to 18ft long, continue to frequent the waters due to the increased activity amongst the shores.

Experts believe the high density of gray seals - which have repopulated thanks to a US hunting ban - coupled with the busyness brought by beachgoers, creates a perfect storm for a sharks to strike.

In 2018, over 150 great white sharks were seen swimming in the region, which experts claimed could be due to climate change and the warming of the Cape's waters sooner than usual.

Just two years later, two of the huge sharks were again spotted near swimmers off the coast, just days after a woman was killed by a great white while swimming just yards off of Maine's Bailey Island.

It seems the predators are now favouring the shores of America's most popular beaches, which are typically packed out with tourists, prompting an increase in attacks.

Cape Cod, as well as Cape Town in South Africa, are "the only two places in the world where you have a high density of people, seals, and great white sharks" in the waters, shark social scientist Christopher Pepin-Neff told National Geographic.

Scientists have suggested shifting hunting grounds, the weather, an increase in staycations, overfishing and even "chance" may have played a part in the rise, after numbers quietly dwindled last year due to the pandemic.

Despite the evident development of human knowledge and understanding of sharks, warning signs do little to discourage swimmers to take care.

Beach signs cautioning people of the dangers were found to be largely ineffective in a 2013 research study that looked at four Australian beaches.

Shockingly, 55 per cent of beach visitors did not even notice them. "There’s so much stimuli (at the beach) you might never notice the signs,” Pepin-Neff added.

Authorities found that "people can become complacent" and "careless", although they are encouraged to assume sharks are always present.

Australia is working to reinvent the fear surrounding shark attacks by instead referring to them as "incidents" or "interactions" - despite there being eight deadly attacks in 2020.

In May this year, an Aussie surfer in New South Wales was tragically mauled to death by a 14ft great white - after he heroically tried to alert others to the danger before he was attacked.

Signs have proved a redundant warning on South African beaches too - as their coloured flag system is disregarded by most swimmers.

The Shark Spotter program shows a red flag when there is a likelihood of sharks in the waters and a white one when a great white has been confirmed to be swimming in the area.

But swimmers, surfers, and paddlers didn’t exit the water until after Shark Spotters flew a white flag, sounded the alarm, and actively cleared the swimming area, a 2017 study found.

People did not exit the water when the red flag was displayed - suggesting to Sarah Waries, CEO of Shark Spotters in Cape Town, that: "We're providing the information and people aren’t absorbing it."

The differing systems used by countries around the world also prove problematic for tourists unfamiliar with the procedure.

The shark attack epidemic is feared to be exacerbated as holidaymakers flock to beaches desperate for sunshine after a year indoors due to the pandemic.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,823
11,110
Melbourne
When Euphemisms (but Never Sharks) Attack

23sciencetimes-newsletter-top-articleLarge-v3.jpg


Shark scientists have been exhorting the public to call human-shark interactions something other than shark attacks, preferring less pejorative terms like “shark encounters.” The scientists emphasize that humans tend to be to blame for shark injuries — stepping accidentally on small sharks, which snap back; swimming in murky water, venturing too close.

“A ‘shark attack’ is a story of intent,” Christopher Pepin-Neff of the University of Sydney, told the Times reporter Alan Yuhas. “But sharks don’t know what people are. They don’t know when you’re in the boat. They don’t know what a propeller is. It’s not an attack.”

But the terms being offered as replacements, while more accurate and less inflammatory, have a ring of gentility to them, evoking the top hats and evening gloves of centuries past.

To wit, a shark incident:

23sciencetimes-newsletter-03-articleLarge.jpg


A shark reaction:

23sciencetimes-newsletter-04-articleLarge.jpg


A shark bite:

23sciencetimes-newsletter-articleLarge.jpg


Meanwhile, scientists elsewhere this week published one of the most detailed views yet of shark guts, using a CT scanner to reveal “the complex inner geographies of more than 20 species of sharks,” Veronique Greenwood writes. The results, in stunning 3-D video, indicate that the spiraling intestine of some sharks behaves like a Tesla valve, drawing fluid forward without moving parts.

The study also appears to confirm the long-held notion that such intricacy helps to slow down digestion and extract the most calories from its prey. Chew on that while you do your part to avoid shark, uh, euphemisms.
 

DavidSSS

Tiger Legend
Dec 11, 2017
6,491
8,232
Melbourne
60 fatal attacks over 10 years? Huh, amateurs.

You should be worrying about dogs, 25,000 people a year die as a result of attacks by rabid dogs. As for dogs, excluding rabies, in the US there are around 4.5 million dog attacks a year and 30 deaths.

In Australia dogs are the third biggest killer behind horses and cows.

DS
 

AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
23,877
9,662
6 deaths per year for a decade. Even Dr Evil realised the sharks need more firepower if they are to justify the constant bedwetting of the anti-shark crew

1627522687875.png
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,823
11,110
Melbourne
Varanus Island shark attack victim has ‘significant’ injuries but in ‘good spirits’ in Royal Perth Hospital

A man who was attacked by a lemon shark while on a fishing charter off a remote Pilbara island arrived at a Perth hospital in “good spirits” last night.

A Royal Perth Hospital spokeswoman said this morning that the Perth man was recovering well after arriving by ambulance about 9.30pm.

The Royal Flying Doctor Service flew the man, aged in his 30s, from Exmouth to Jandakot Airport after he spent more than 10 hours aboard a charter boat following the attack near Varanus Island about 8.30pm Tuesday.

A St John Ambulance spokeswoman said the victim had significant injuries to his lower body, including “a few bites”, but that they were not life-threatening.

He is in a serious but stable condition.

The man reportedly arrived at hospital in good spirits, describing the shark as “a big one” and estimating its length at more than 3m.

Lemon sharks typically live in waters less than 92m deep and can grow up to almost 4m long.

After the attack on Tuesday night, the man was given first aid on the charter vessel.

It took several hours to get back to the mainland.

Paramedics met the man onshore, who took him to Exmouth Hospital before putting him on a fight to Jandakot.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development fisheries officers are investigating the incident, which was only reported at 10.30am yesterday and happened about 120km west of Karratha.

Earlier in the day, a shark advice alert was issued on SharkSmart after a sighting in the area.

- - - - -

Shark Series – The Lemon Shark

Here’s all you need to know about the Lemon Shark

It’s closely related to the great white shark.

Lemon sharks are sturdy, powerful and can grow up to 3 meters (10 feet).

But relax. Don’t panic when you see one of these sleek creatures during your dive.

Lemon sharks do not attack humans.

- - - - -

The above is an example of irresponsible dissemination of information in the name of protecting sharks. Lemon sharks can and have attacked people previously. All large carcharhinids possess the dentition to bring you to grief and should never be underestimated.

ZXwJ2YN.jpg
 

tigerman

It's Tiger Time
Mar 17, 2003
16,273
7,693
Varanus Island shark attack victim has ‘significant’ injuries but in ‘good spirits’ in Royal Perth Hospital

A man who was attacked by a lemon shark while on a fishing charter off a remote Pilbara island arrived at a Perth hospital in “good spirits” last night.

A Royal Perth Hospital spokeswoman said this morning that the Perth man was recovering well after arriving by ambulance about 9.30pm.

The Royal Flying Doctor Service flew the man, aged in his 30s, from Exmouth to Jandakot Airport after he spent more than 10 hours aboard a charter boat following the attack near Varanus Island about 8.30pm Tuesday.

A St John Ambulance spokeswoman said the victim had significant injuries to his lower body, including “a few bites”, but that they were not life-threatening.

He is in a serious but stable condition.

The man reportedly arrived at hospital in good spirits, describing the shark as “a big one” and estimating its length at more than 3m.

Lemon sharks typically live in waters less than 92m deep and can grow up to almost 4m long.

After the attack on Tuesday night, the man was given first aid on the charter vessel.

It took several hours to get back to the mainland.

Paramedics met the man onshore, who took him to Exmouth Hospital before putting him on a fight to Jandakot.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development fisheries officers are investigating the incident, which was only reported at 10.30am yesterday and happened about 120km west of Karratha.

Earlier in the day, a shark advice alert was issued on SharkSmart after a sighting in the area.

- - - - -

Shark Series – The Lemon Shark

Here’s all you need to know about the Lemon Shark

It’s closely related to the great white shark.

Lemon sharks are sturdy, powerful and can grow up to 3 meters (10 feet).

But relax. Don’t panic when you see one of these sleek creatures during your dive.

Lemon sharks do not attack humans.

- - - - -

The above is an example of irresponsible dissemination of information in the name of protecting sharks. Lemon sharks can and have attacked people previously. All large carcharhinids possess the dentition to bring you to grief and should never be underestimated.

ZXwJ2YN.jpg
A lot of unhappy people.........the shark bite victim attacked the shark.
The ****wit jumped on the sharks back, ruining the charter that they had paid thousands of dollars for.
Should make the **** pay for the cost of the Royal Flying Doctor.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: 1 user

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,823
11,110
Melbourne
A lot of unhappy people.........the shark bite victim attacked the shark.
The ****wit jumped on the sharks back, ruining the charter that they had paid thousands of dollars for.
Should make the **** pay for the cost of the Royal Flying Doctor.
OMG. Apologies to the shark. What a half.wit (why is this word censored?).

He was actually in charge of the charter. It was very subtly hinted at in the initial reports which said few charters are prepared to venture that far out.
 

Willo

Tiger Legend
Oct 13, 2007
15,841
1,813
Aldinga Beach
A lot of unhappy people.........the shark bite victim attacked the shark.
The ****wit jumped on the sharks back, ruining the charter that they had paid thousands of dollars for.
Should make the **** pay for the cost of the Royal Flying Doctor.
Good enough for Aquaman
 
  • Haha
Reactions: 1 user