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Sharks

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,903
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Northern beaches surfer who died in shark attack ‘tried to warn others’


A male surfer from Sydney’s northern beaches has died after being bitten by a 4½-metre shark on the NSW Mid North Coast.
NSW Ambulance paramedics were called to Tuncurry Beach near Forster about 11.15am.

Four ambulance crews treated the man, aged 59, who was bitten on his upper thigh while he was surfing.

The man, who was holidaying with friends, lost a significant amount of blood and went into cardiac arrest.

“It’s believed that when the attack occurred the man did actually see the shark and called out to try and warn others,” Superintendent Christopher Schilt told reporters on Tuesday.

“And very heroically his friends were able to bring him back into shore after he had been attacked.”

His friends dragged him out of the water and onto the beach where a retired paramedic performed CPR until further help arrived.
A specialist medical team flew up in a helicopter from Sydney, but by 12.40pm the man had died.

NSW Ambulance Inspector Joshua Smyth extended his sympathies to the man’s family and said paramedics were faced with “a confronting scene in difficult terrain”.

“Bystanders, including a retired paramedic, did a valiant job pulling the patient from the water and commencing CPR before paramedics arrived. These people should be commended for their brave actions,” he said.

The NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) extended its condolences to the man’s family and said it had deployed drumlines and drones at the beach.

“Any target sharks [including] white, tiger or bull sharks that are caught will be relocated about 1.5 kilometres offshore before being tagged and released,” the department said.

“NSW DPI shark scientists have analysed photographs of the bite and determined a white shark of approximately 4.5 metres in length is likely responsible for the bite.”

Two other sharks were detected in the area in the hours before and after the attack.

On Monday night, a 2½-metre great white shark was detected at Main Beach in Forster, about two kilometres south of Tuncurry Beach.

On Tuesday afternoon, a different white shark measuring between 2.5 and 2.8 metres in length was pinged by the same shark detector.

Macquarie University behavioural ecologist Culum Brown said there was nothing unusual about three white sharks being detected in the same area in a short period of time because they are known to cover great distances.

“These guys are cruising up and down the coast all the time,” Professor Brown said.

“There’s a lot of hysteria about the shark population getting out of control – they’re definitely not. White sharks are listed as vulnerable for a reason: their numbers are declining.”

Taronga Conservation Society keeps a log of shark attacks in Australia each year.

According to its database, this attack marks the first fatality in Australia this year, although a Victorian man disappeared in South Australia in January and was suspected to have died from a shark attack when his damaged wetsuit and flippers were found nearby.

Eight people died from shark attacks in Australia last year, the deadliest since 1929.

There were no deaths nationally in 2019 and just one each in 2017 and 2018.

Forster resident Billy Fenton, who was walking along the Tuncurry breakwall 90 minutes before the attack, said “sharks are always out there”.

“It’s a tragedy because a fatality in the ocean is the last thing we’re thinking about, otherwise we wouldn’t be out there,” he said.
Following the attack, beaches between Blackhead Beach and Burgess Beach were closed for 24 hours.

- - - - -

Bit irresponsible of the university researcher to claim that GWS numbers are declining after the "guys" have been protected for 25 years, and most signs point to the opposite. But then they're a special breed.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,903
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Melbourne
Fisherman dies after shark attack

It took fishermen more than half an hour to free Donovan Haywood from the mouth of a shark that attacked and bit him while he was fishing in the Salmon Point area, located off the coast of Little London in Westmoreland, on Saturday.

Haywood, otherwise called 'Doggie', of Darling Street in Savanna-la-Mar, Westmoreland, died as a result of the injuries. The shark escaped with one of his arms and inflicted several wounds to his upper body.

Clive Campbell, captain of the 18-foot boat on which Haywood and 11 other fishermen set out to sea on Saturday, was almost in tears as he told a most horrific story. He said they were spearfishing in the water when the shark attacked.

"The shark cum up from underneath him and grab on pon him entire left side and have him a flash him all bout inna di water," Campbell said.

"Every minute the shark go down wid 'Doggie' then him cum back up, all a wi have fi form a circle because the water full a blood an wi don't want him grab nobody else," the fisherman added.

He told The Star that one of his brothers used a speargun to shoot di shark, and it was at that point that it released Haywood.

Kemesha Titus, a sister of the deceased, said that Haywood, who is the father of four children, has been a fisherman ever since he was a teenager. She said her brother was an expert at deep sea spearfishing.

"Up to now mi caah believe seh shark kill him because him always a tell mi all kind a story bout wen him a shoot fish, and how wen dem si shark dem haffi tek off di fish dem off a di string one by one, and feed the shark until dem reach safety," she said.

"Although all a wi a grieve, wi still glad fi know seh wi get him body fi bury," the sister said.

Chrisona Haywood, the deceased's eldest daughter, is struggling to come to terms with his sudden loss.

"Him tell me before seh 'Daughter, shark attack me nuff time out a sea already, and me affi be skill to get weh from them'. But me really never know say shark would attack in this way now and to see him go like that it really hard," she told THE STAR.

Recalling that her dad last words in a video that was sent to her from the scene were "Me nuh dead man, me a guh be alright."

A video of the fisherman in distress has been making its way around social media. Chrisona says its circulation is adding to the family's pain.

"I would really appreciate if people stop circulating it because I don't want to remember him in that way. I want to close my eyes and see him always referring to me as his daughter, and smiling," she said.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,903
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Melbourne
Surfer badly injured in NSW shark attack

A man has sustained a serious injury after a shark took a "significant bite" out of his arm while he was surfing on the NSW mid north coast.

The man, believed to be aged in his 20s, was surfing at Crescent Head Beach on Monday 4:30pm when he was attacked.

He was helped out of the water, treated by paramedics and later airlifted to John Hunter Hospital in a serious but stable condition.

NSW Ambulance Inspector Andrew Beverley said the bystanders who helped the man from the water and provided "crucial initial first aid" should be praised.

"It was a significant bite and the man suffered serious injuries to his arm as a result," Mr Beverley said.

"It might be cold at the moment but it's important to always be aware of your surrounding in the water, even in winter."

Officers will contact the Department of Primary Industry to investigate the circumstances surrounding the incident.
The beach has been closed by Surf Life Saving NSW.

3ef5227d8b4a68f11e115bae4183b35e

A chunk was taken out of the surfboard. Picture: Facebook/Port Macquarie ALS Lifeguards
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,903
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Melbourne
Archaeologists Uncover a 3,000-Year-Old Shark Attack Victim

Marine biologists have long tried to dispel the myth that sharks are vicious predators that target humans. Nonetheless, fatal shark assaults do occasionally happen. According to University of Florida's Museum of Natural History, 57 unprovoked shark bites occurred worldwide in 2020, with 13 of those being fatal. Now experts have unearthed the skeletal remains of the oldest known shark attack victim, reports Sophie Wingate for the Independent.

University of Oxford researchers J. Alyssa White and Rick Schulting recently uncovered an adult male skeleton known as Tsukumo No. 24 at the Tsukumo burial site, a prehistoric hunter-gatherer cemetery in Japan's Okayama Prefecture, while researching violent trauma on human remains of prehistoric hunter-gatherers, according to a statement. The victim displayed nearly 790 traumatic injuries including incisions, punctures and fractures that showed no signs of healing, which suggest that the incident was fatal. The researchers published their findings in the August 2021 issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports.

Per the statement, the team used a combination of scientific and forensic methods to determine what wounded the man. While analyzing the skeleton, archaeologists concluded that the man probably died between 1370 B.C. and 1010 B.C. and that his injuries were primarily concentrated on his arms, legs, chest and stomach.

Experts used this information and other evidence to determine that a tiger shark or a great white shark most likely ambushed the victim. The injuries resembled those made with metal weapons, but scientists used radiocarbon dating to determine that the attack occurred at a time in Japan when people didn’t have those, notes Haaretz’s Ruth Schuster. The team considered other possible assailants—like crabs, bears and boars—but the types of lesions on the remains didn't fit the bill, so researchers ruled those out.

“Given the injuries, he was clearly the victim of a shark attack,” say White and Schulting in the statement. “The man may well have been fishing with companions at the time, since he was recovered quickly. And, based on the character and distribution of the tooth marks, the most likely species responsible was either a tiger or white shark.”

As Mindy Weisberger writes for Live Science, tiger sharks and great white sharks inhabit Japan's Seto Inland Sea near the burial site. Both species have previously mauled humans, though they don’t usually attack people unless they’re provoked.

“Many victims of shark attacks in the past may not have been recovered for burial,” Schulting tells Haaretz. “But there are two other factors at play. One is that evidence of the injuries to bone caused by sharks may not always be recognized.”

Since archaeological discoveries of shark attacks are relatively uncommon, the team decided to consult George Burgess, director emeritus of the Florida Program for Shark Research. Together, the international team was able to reconstruct the assault using X-ray computed tomography (CT), which allowed experts to see and map the person’s wounds, per Live Science.

These scans showed that most of the victim's ribs were fractured and bitten and that his chest cavity and abdomen were probably eviscerated. The wounds were also concentrated on his left hip and leg, and he may have lost his left hand while trying to protect his body from the attack.

Scholars also speculate that the victim lived during the Jomon period in Japan, about 2,300 to 14,000 years ago, according to Haaretz. People of the Jomon culture likely hunted and fished to survive, and Tsukumo No. 24 may have perished during such a fishing expedition. Prior to this find, the oldest known shark attack victim was almost 1,000 years younger, per Live Science.

Construction workers initially uncovered the Tsukumo site in 1860, and the first archaeological digs occurred in 1915. Since then, archaeologists have found more than 170 human remains there. However, only one skeleton had such gruesome and widespread injuries.

“Humans have a long, shared history with sharks,” the scientists write in the study. “This is one of the relatively rare instances when humans were on their menu, and not the reverse.”

268778_web.jpeg

Though researchers recovered most of the person's remains, experts were unable to find some portions of his skeleton. (Courtesy of Kyoto University)
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,903
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Melbourne
Man killed in horror shallow water shark attack

A man cooling off in knee-deep water after an afternoon boozing with pals at an obscure Brazilian beach has died after being bitten multiple times by a shark, likely a bull or tiger.

Brazilian media is showing graphic footage of a man in his fifties, dead, face down on the sand, a large bite on the back of his right thigh and with his right hand gone. You can find it if you search hard enough but, warning, I wish I’d never seen it.

Glazier Ademir Sebastião da Silva was in the water having a p!ss next to the man. He said he saw him staggering and the water red with blood.

“Since the beach doesn’t have a bathroom, I went into the sea to pee. It was right next to him, in waist-deep water,” he said.
The man fell unconscious on the sand.

“It could be me. It was God’s deliverance. If I had been diving or lingered in the water, I could have been attacked,”said da Silva.
The joint where he got hit, Piedade beach, is in Recife, a large city on the eastern tip of Brazil. Heaviest joint for sharks. Tourists regularly lose limbs.

A few years ago, after a tourist was hit in waist-deep water there. A beach snack seller, Maria Lourenço, shook his head, said, yeah, messed up, but “I’ve been working on this beach for 25 years and during this time I have witnessed a number of ferocious attacks. It was horrible to see. Each time it is very frightening and sad.”

On the beach is a large sign that don’t pull punches. Danger. Risk of Shark Attack.

ap504350037207.jpg


Turns out the problem is, likely, man-made.

In the early nineties, the port of Suape was built to attract large ships.

According to Quartz, the construction and this ship traffic disrupted two significant shark populations in the waters surrounding Recife: tiger sharks and bull sharks. The trails of garbage left behind by shipping vessels en route to the port attract these migratory creatures, drawing them dangerously close to popular beaches.

As we all know, tigers and bulls, like their big brother the Great White, don’t *smile* around.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,903
11,228
Melbourne
P: "I'm sorry, Mister Soandso, I have some bad news. Your son has had a negative encounter with a shark."

F: "Oh no! How negative?"

P: "Well you'll save money on the funeral."
 
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Willo

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Oct 13, 2007
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Aldinga Beach

AngryAnt

Tiger Legend
Nov 25, 2004
23,946
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Meanwhile humans are killing 11,000 sharks per hour.


Sharks don't use social media so there are few complaints, except from a few nutty humans who feel the shark threat to humanity is a wee bit exaggerated. I mean, @LeeToRainesToRoach was so desperate to find recent attacks he had to go to Jamaica, Brazil and then back in time 3000 years.
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

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Jun 4, 2006
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Sharks don't use social media so there are few complaints, except from a few nutty humans who feel the shark threat to humanity is a wee bit exaggerated.
We only eat a few species in Australia, unlike some other countries where anything that moves is fair game. But nobody eats the ones that eat us.
 

AngryAnt

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Nov 25, 2004
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We only eat a few species in Australia, unlike some other countries where anything that moves is fair game. But nobody eats the ones that eat us.

Wrong. Great Whites are killed for shark fin soup along with millions of other sharks. Also sharks don't care if we kill them for food, or kill them as accidental catches in nets or long-line fishing, or kill them through loss of habitat, loss of prey. They just die, because we are screwing the planet.

Global estimate of Great White populations is down to around 3,500. Globally. Humans did that.

But yes, the 10 confirmed human deaths from sharks in 2020 globally is huge existential threat to humanity.
 
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LeeToRainesToRoach

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Jun 4, 2006
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Wrong. Great Whites are killed for shark fin soup along with millions of other sharks.
They're protected, even in China. If they're being finned then it's like rhino poaching. Illegal.

Their flesh is riddled with uric acid because they don't p!ss. And ciguatera in some parts. Poisonous.
Global estimate of Great White populations is down to around 3,500. Globally. Humans did that.
CSIRO recently estimated the number of whites off the east coast of Australia at 5460, and they range worldwide.
 

AngryAnt

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Nov 25, 2004
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They're protected, even in China. If they're being finned then it's like rhino poaching. Illegal.

Their flesh is riddled with uric acid because they don't p!ss. And ciguatera in some parts. Poisonous.

CSIRO recently estimated the number of whites off the east coast of Australia at 5460, and they range worldwide.

Oh yes, because it's illegal it never happens. And Chinese shark fin ships would never do anything illegal, surely. LOL

Not to mention all the "accidental" through trawling, loss of habitat, etc etc etc. Forgot to deal with those dude? Too hard?

The CSIRO study was from 2016 - interestingly it stated around 750 adult sharks off the south/west and about 1450 adult sharks off the east. The rest are juveniles, most of which won't reach adulthood. I'll give you the 4500 though, makes all the difference in the world, the seas are just teeming with great whites ready to devour all who dare enter.


Better you go back to the argument that that the majority of the 200,000 people who die from drowning globally were dead through secret shark attacks. That gave me a good laugh.
 

LeeToRainesToRoach

Tiger Legend
Jun 4, 2006
32,903
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Melbourne
Oh yes, because it's illegal it never happens. And Chinese shark fin ships would never do anything illegal, surely. LOL
...
Didn't say it doesn't happen. Didn't say overfishing isn't a problem. But the lefty activists tend to look the other way 'cos China.
Better you go back to the argument that that the majority of the 200,000 people who die from drowning globally were dead through secret shark attacks. That gave me a good laugh.
Show me where I said that.

Come on, stop claiming I've said things that I clearly didn't. It's dishonest.
 

kyuss

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May 13, 2012
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I haven't followed this thread at all, but if there's any argument about the protection of sharks, then surely it is just an is what it is conclusion. Do we worry about lightening deaths and try and put a stop to lightening? Flooding, earthquakes, volcanoes? Nature will do what it does plain and simple. Let it be. Death is tragic but enevatable. We live in nature and we are mortal. thats just how it is.
 
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